Why Some Of The Best Mid-Century Pieces Come From Mexico

This month, we’re putting a spotlight on a country known for its gorgeous beaches, excellent food, and lively culture: Mexico. It’s a country that isn’t just on our mind for its promise of warmth and escape, but also for its incredible design scene, past and present. Though today, cities like Oaxaca, Tulum, and Sayulita have thriving design scenes that produce cutting-edge décor which pay homage to ancient techniques and materials, we’re fascinated by Mexico’s mid-century period — an era where rich color met innovative forms, shapes, and worldly influences.

The boom in design during the mid-century was perhaps made possible by two things: The tradition of arts (Mexico has a long history of skilled artisans going back to the Mayan and Aztec civilizations), but also from the influx of emigrants and refugees that followed from the wars in Europe. Mexico welcomed those who had to leave their native countries of Germany, France, Spain, and other European countries — and many were artists, designers, and architects. Educated in Europe and the United States, these new residents brought with them a wealth of knowledge and new points of view.

Collaborations flourished in Mexico, where apprentices learned from talented local artisans, fostering new ideas. Many pieces were custom-made instead of mass-produced, making furniture closer in spirit to a work of art. Again, because of the different cultural points of view, you’ll notice a wide range of influences in pieces created during this time — from Asian to the Bauhaus movement, Art Deco to Modern, the International movement to Pre-Hispanic.

Today, there’s been a distinct uptick in interest in Mid-Century Mexican design, led by prominent antiques dealers and designers. Interested in starting your own collection? Take a look at these fantastic vintage pieces currently for sale at Viyet:

Pepe Mendoza Mexican Modernist Malachite Inset Brass Pendant

Pepe Mendoza was well-known for producing brass hardware, extravagant lamps, and brass tables based on pre-Columbian motifs which he modernized to conform Mexican and international tastes. Bold and unique, this sculptural light fixture is composed of brass with malachite detailing. Handmade in Mexico in the 1950s, this eye-catching pendant brings instant style and sophistication to any space.

Miguel Pineda Vintage Enamel Dish

Miguel Pineda is a Mexican artist and enamelist. Colorful and one-of-a-kind, this bold egg-shaped dish features a vibrant modernist design. Handmade in the 1970s, this eye-catching enamel dish is stamped for ensured authenticity.

Feders Mexican Multi-Colored Glass And Iron Chandelier

Vintage design style when applied to furniture and home décor means the piece has the depth and soul of a previous era, having been produced from 1940 through the 1990s, lending unique interest when mixed with other periods. This tall vintage chandelier is unique for the colorful and sturdy materials it is made from. Vibrantly colored hand-blown glass cubes combine with the iron chains for a brightly unique decorative accent.

Erik Buck Danish Mid-Century Modern Bar Stools

Created by Danish Mid-Century Modern innovator Erik Buck, these vintage bar stools have gorgeous teak hardwood frames with faux black leather upholstery. Curated by Ambianic, their sleek 1960s style has a timeless appeal that would look spectacular at any home bar or breakfast counter. Sold in a set of two.

Mid-Century Modern Enamel Plate

Curated by Ambianic, this vintage Mid-Century Modern enameled plate has a front streaked with brown, white, red, and black tones while the back is a rich shade of green with black accents. A wonderful piece to display in an eclectic china cabinet or as a chic wall hanging.

SaveSave

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s